Today I am dedicating my post to raise awareness about food Insecurity in America.  I decided to take part in the "Food Bloggers Against Hunger" project after watching the documentary, A Place at the Table.  It opened my eyes to a lot of issues that I never knew about or even considered before.  At first I thought I would have nothing to contribute to a project such as this one.  What do I know about being food insecure?  I can’t even begin to understand how difficult it must be when you can’t feed your family.  I sit behind a computer screen and write about fresh wholesome recipes made with ingredients I didn’t have to think twice about putting in my grocery cart. I take for granted being able to walk into a grocery store to purchase whatever my heart desires that day.  And lastly what could someone like me actually do?  How does one person so far removed from this issue help at all?
    After thinking through this for weeks I came to understand that I could help in a small way.  The little that I can do is listen, learn and help spread awareness.  One person can’t change a whole country and the politics behind it, but there are small things we can all do that will help.

Drive the Demand for Better Food

     What does that mean?  It means we need to make a conscious effort to support local organic farmers that grow fruits and vegetables.  We subsidize the wrong crops in this country and by creating a higher demand for locally grown produce we will create the need for more of it.  Farmers markets are becoming more and more popular.  You can visit, Local Harvest.org to find one in your area.  Farmer's markets are seasonal so when they are not available make better choices in your grocery store.  Always try to buy organic fruits and vegetables that are produced as close to where you live as possible.  If there are no farmer's markets in your area and you live in New Jersey like I do, look for the "Jersey Fresh" signs in your local grocery stores.

Spread Awareness and Write to the Politicians in Your State

    Visit this website and submit a letter to congress.  It only takes a minute to send a letter asking the politicians in your state to support anti-hunger legislation. This is a quick and easy way to help!  (I sent my letter :)

    Please do your part as a fellow American and learn about the issues that we all face together even if they don’t affect you directly.  Check out the documentary, A Place at the Table.  You can download and watch it on iTunes or Amazon.  If you enjoy this documentary as much as I did, then please urge others to see it as well.
    So the dish that I am featuring today is a Fire Roasted Tomato Soup.  I wanted to have something that could serve as both a hearty vegetarian dinner, and provide some great leftovers for lunch.  One big pot makes this soup easy to prepare, all the ingredients can easily be found in a typical grocery store and this soup is super fast to make (about a half an hour).  I also wanted to make this soup because it is a family favorite and the weather here in New Jersey has still been a bit chilly. 

    I tried to calculate the cost of this meal per person, but it will vary greatly depending on the ingredients that you use.  I used mostly organic items when I made this dish, and when I calculated out the price it came to about $ 3.32 per person per serving (large bowl of soup and big wedge of bread).  If you were to purchase regular items the cost decreases to $2.58 per person per serving.  The personal choice is up to you, but if you can afford it, purchase organic tomatoes, spinach and peppers because they are all items that are subjected to heavy amounts of pesticides when grown conventionally.         

Fire Roasted Tomato Soup

6 Servings

2 tablespoons olive oil
1 medium onion, chopped
3 cloves of garlic, minced
2 (28oz) cans of fired roasted whole tomatoes with their juices
2 cups of vegetable broth (To save some money make your own from food scraps, Oh my Veggies shows you how, HERE)
4 cups of water
3 teaspoons of salt
1 teaspoon dried basil and dried oregano
1 teaspoon ground paprika
pinch of ground cayenne pepper  (if you like some heat)
1/2 cup of whole wheat orzo (or any other type of small pasta)
2 cups of cooked cannellini beans or 1 (19oz) can

2 roasted red peppers, chopped (use either homemade or a small jar of chopped roasted red peppers)
a few handfuls of fresh baby spinach
Fresh ground black pepper to taste
grated Parmesan cheese for topping

    In a food process or blender, puree the tomatoes with their juices and set aside. In a large soup pot heat the oil over medium high heat.  Add the chopped onions and saute until soft and translucent, about 10 minutes.  Add the minced garlic and cook 1 minute more.  Add the pureed tomatoes, vegetable broth, water, salt, basil, oregano, paprika, and cayenne pepper (if using) and bring to a boil.  Reduce to a simmer and add the orzo, cannellini beans and roasted red peppers.  Simmer, partially covered for 15 mintues.  Just before serving (see note below) add the fresh spinach and a few cracks of black pepper.  Allow the soup to cook just until the spinach wilts.  At the table serve your soup with some bread and grated Parmesan Cheese. 

NOTE:  The spinach is best when it is only cooked until it is wilted.  If you do not want to serve the whole soup at one meal then ladle the extra soup into containers before adding in the spinach to the soup you will eat.  You can reheat the remainder of the soup another day or even store the extra in the freezer for an even quicker and easier dinner another day.
 


Comments

04/08/2013 2:09pm

This soup looks amazing, and for such a good cause! It's a good thing to get involved with, and I agree, crop subsidies are in all the wrong places. I love that this soup has beans it it to make it more substantial. Since we're still totally experiencing winter weather, it's on my list for soup night!

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04/08/2013 4:20pm

Hi Katie, thanks for stopping by and taking a look! I think I add beans to almost every soup I make, they definitely make it feel more like a complete meal. Today is actually the first day it has warmed up around me...hope the weather warms up a bit by you too! -Sandra

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04/08/2013 5:52pm

Sandra, you're absolutely right about demanding better, organic, locally-grown food. When I think back to 10-15 years ago, organic food was very hard to come by in mainstream grocery stores. And organic was ridiculously expensive. Nowadays, with more and more people demanding organic and locally-grown produce and products, these same stores all have at least one aisle devoted to organic food. And prices are slowly dropping a bit.

It's simple supply and demand. If the majority of people in America demand and only buy organic/locally-grown food, the stores will begin offering it more. And with more demand, stores will begin competing for our business, resulting in lower prices. Together, we can make these kinds of change happen!

And the soup sounds fantastic!

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04/09/2013 11:58am

Thanks Chris :) Supply and Demand is where it is at...do you also notice how no one knew what gluten-free was a few years ago and now some grocery stores have a whole section devoted to it. We decide what is provided to us by demanding it!!!

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04/09/2013 6:38am

Love it! Thanks for recipe :)

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04/09/2013 11:59am

Thanks for your comment :)

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