Alright, this is a quick little post to go with my quick decision to make jam today.  I have been thinking about doing this for the last week or so, mostly because I wanted something to put in my breakfast crepes this weekend.  Crepes are a new favorite in our house and I have quickly gone through most of my fall fruit preserves in the past couples of months.  Honey apple butter, cardamom peach jam and cinnamon pear butter are now all gone and irreplaceable in this particular month in the calender year, so I decided to check in my freezer.  I saw that I had a bunch of frozen berries taking up valuable real estate that will be badly needed in a few weeks for my super stash of strawberries and sweet and tart cherries.  With berry season right around the corner I didn't need last years stragglers getting lost in the frozen recesses, only to be tossed away when new tenants moved in.  I didn't want to think about what combination of fruit I wanted to use so they all got thrown in together and here I present to you: Mixed Berry Jam. 

    If you have never made jam before let me give a few little tips.  Try to use a pot that has lots of room (very high sides) because there will be super hot splatters to deal with.  Definitely invest in a digital thermometer and use it (made that mistake once and I unintentionally made fig candy).  Don't get discouraged if it doesn't come out right.  If it comes out a little runny then just tell people you made berry syrup instead, they will still be just as impressed, I promise.  You need to become familiar with how jam feels and how you test to see when it is set, and the only way to do that is to try it. 

Mixed Berry Jam

made 1 1/2 pints of jam

6 cups (780 grams) of mixed berries:  Blackberries, Raspberries and Blueberries (Fresh or Frozen)
Juice from one lemon
1 cup sugar (I used Sucanat but feel free to use what you have)

1/2 cup *buckwheat honey


Start a boiling water bath if you plan on processing your jam.  Since this recipe doesn't make that much jam you could always keep it in a container in the refrigerator and not worry about canning.  

Place all the ingredients into a non-reactive pot and bring to a boil over medium to high heat.  Keep the mixture at a rolling boil and stir occasionally so that the bottom doesn't burn.  Heat the mixture until a thermometer reaches the set point at 220° F  (You could perform a freezer test if you want as well).  The mixture should be thick.  When you spoon through the mixture it should separate so you can see the bottom of the pot and it should sheet off the spoon.

Sterilize your jars, ring and lids and get them ready on the counter.  Spoon the hot jam into the jars, seal finger tip tight and process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes.  Set on the counter to cool and test the seals when they have cooled down. 

*Buckwheat Honey:  This recipe calls for buckwheat honey because I personally love it.  The smell is...well lets not talk about what it smells like because if you never noticed it before you will once I say it, and then you will never be able to eat buckwheat honey again.  You don't need to use it if you don't want to.  You can either use another 1/2 cup of sugar or a different kind of honey.  Everything about this recipe can be changed to suit your preference so please deviate if you want/need to.        

"Help your brother's boat across, and your own will reach the shore."
                                                                                                  ~ Hindu Proverb

 


Comments

05/03/2013 9:47pm

Wow, such stunning photos! I've never made jam, but now I don't just want to... I NEED TO! And crepes?! When's breakfast at your house? I'm on my way.

One question. What's "the freezer test" that you speak of?

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05/04/2013 12:02am

Hey Chris, The freezer test is basically a great way to tell if your jam has set properly. You put a plate in the freezer and let it get really cold...then as you are making your jam you put a little bit of it on the plate and put it back in the freezer until the jam becomes room temp/cold...then you basically poke the jam and see what it will basically turn into once it cools down...it should be all jam-like...then you taste it too :) That was probably the worst explanation ever but you can find out more if you read any intro to canning and jam making. I normally will do a freezer test, but you don't always need to.

Breakfast is early with my little guys around...if you can get over at 8:00 you are more then welcome ;) (promise me you will sleep in one morning on the weekend...I haven't slept in for 3 years)

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08/19/2015 6:42am

Thanks for the reminder that we all need now and again. To stop thinking about tomorrow, and to relish in today.

Carole
05/17/2013 7:51pm

Lovely work! Would you be happy to link it in to the current Food on Friday which is all about jams, jellies and relishes? This is the <a href="http://caroleschatter.blogspot.co.nz/2013/05/Jam-Jelly-Relish-recipe-links-Food-Friday.html"> link </a>. I do hope to see you there. Cheers

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Beery jam mostly use as juice or tonic but Cherry we cannot use it as for juice. This thing mostly used in baking items and others kinds mainly its for decorating fruit to present dishes with unique and nice way. Yummy post :)

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08/05/2015 5:11pm

Its a delicious looking jam. I love berries, jams and jellies made from them. I love to have black berry jam in which black berry remains in its slightly original form, but I dont know how to make it. Would you like to share. I recommend essay services for those who dont have much time to complete assignments.

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08/19/2015 6:41am

Thanks Kelly! I got up in the middle of eating to take a few shots and everyone looked at me and said, "what are you doing" to which I replied, "I WANT to remember THIS meal" I think that last photo is one of my favorites from that day :)

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08/19/2015 6:44am

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08/19/2015 6:44am

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08/19/2015 6:46am

he older I get, the more keenly aware I am that the time we have together and the love that we share is truly the only thing that matters. Your grandmother does sound like an incredible woman -- lucky you. I'm especially enjoying the action shots in this segment and the expansive table spread at the end. So warm and it ties the family theme together beautifully. Thinking of you with love and light - xo.

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Rosemary Onion Focaccia

06/24/2013

22 Comments

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How do I even begin to explain the past two months of my life. I have tried on numerous occasions, but finding the right words is harder then I expected. I've stumbled upon a few different food blogs with heavy subjects attached to an undeserving recipe. They always leave you with that same uneasiness when talking with someone who is suffering from the loss of a loved one. "How are you doing?" - of course we know not to ask this question but surely enough the words form from your lips. I told myself I would never write such a post, I would never get caught in such a blogging faux pas. Yet here I am, sentences forming with every press of a button.

I've come to realize that even though I write a public food blog in this small corner of the internet, the content is driven by personal experiences. This blog is about my life which isn't always perfect, and if you know me personally you know that I don't pretend like it is. So all pity aside please, because we all live real lives and suffer real losses. For myself and my family, these past two months have been difficult because we have mourned the loss of my paternal grandmother, my husbands mother and the father of a very close friend, all of which were sudden and unexpected. In every instance I have seen that the memories we make with each other become the most important and cherished gift we are given by those that leave this world before us. If ever a life lesson was driven into my mind, it is that we need to place more importance on spending time with the ones we love. Which is why we decided to take a much need trip down to see my husbands grandparents this last weekend.
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It's not a short trip, but it is one I always look forward to making. "Over the river and through the woods to grandmother's house we go" plays endlessly in my head over each expansive length of road. Do you have one of those women in your family? The matriarch who prepares everyone's favorite meals and who possesses all the knowledge and experience you could ever hope to learn in a lifetime. You could rummage through all her handwritten recipes and still only hope to one day learn to cook as well as she does. Whose hard life shows not only on her hands, but her heart as well. Even in the shadow of her loss she still manages to prepare an amazing meal, and offer up comforting words to those that need it most.

"We count our blessings."

Hand crochet doilies and curtains. Plant cuttings rooting in every window corner. The smell of thousands of home cooked meals clinging to your clothes. A bag of leftovers handed to you as you slowly make your way back to the car as the sun is setting. A time most needed by all and a time you promise to make again soon. The details I want to forever remember; the cherished memories I'll hold in my heart.
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So what do to bring to what you know will be one of those memorable meals of your life? The means by which to soak up every morsel of flavor. You make a bread suitable for drowning each and every piece in a bath of seafood goodness! Focaccia is quick, easy and perfectly suited for red sauce so that was what I wanted to bring.
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Rosemary Onion Focaccia
serves 6-8

1 (7-gram packet) active dry yeast
5 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
4 cups flour
1 tablespoon powdered rosemary
1 tablespoon salt
1 1/4 cups of water
4 branches rosemary
1 small red onion, sliced
cornmeal
coarse sea salt

Dissolve yeast in 1/2 cup of warm water. After 10 minutes add 2 tablespoons of oil to the yeast. Combine the flour, salt and powdered rosemary in a large mixing bowl. Add the yeast mixture to the flour along with 1 and 1/4 cups of water and stir until the dough becomes too stiff to stir anymore. Turn out the dough onto a floured surface and knead it until smooth. Shape the dough into a ball and coat it with oil. Place the dough in a bowl and cover it with a dishcloth. Place in a warm spot to rise for 2 hours. Transfer the dough to a floured surface and using your fingertips, press the dough out into a 12'' circle and place it on an inverted cookie sheet that has been dusted with cornmeal. Cover the dough with the dishcloth and set aside for 1 more hour.

Put a pizza stone in the oven and preheat it to 400°F. Whisk together remaining 3 tablespoons of olive oil and 1 tablespoon of water in a small bowl. Press the dough with your fingers to create dimple on the surface then brush with the oil/water mixture. Scatter slices of onion and branches of rosemary over the top of the dough and sprinkle on some coarse sea salt. Transfer the dough onto the warm pizza stone and bake until golden brown, about 30 minutes.

“Seize the moment. Remember all those women on the 'Titanic' who waved off the dessert cart.” -Erma Bombeck
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Comments
Chris @ Shared Appet

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08/19/2015 6:47am

layanan aqiqah murah dan enak

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